Hi there. I'm Kate.

vintagegal:

Backstage at the 1954 Pierre Balmain Couture show. Photos by Mark Shaw.

vintagegal:

The Sisters G,  1930

vintagegal:

The Sisters G,  1930

Nothing has changed

asylum-art:

At Joshua Liner Gallery, New Works from Tiffany Bozic.

For this work, Bozic remembers a trip to Mount Lassen, California, with her husband. Recalling the experience—even though several years had passed—Bozic finally sat down to create this painting, remembering her imagination of “deep sea organisms slowly drifting up into the sky from the black current of the water.” She also notes, “I suppose the image stuck with me because it could be a metaphor for a lot of my different emotions… some light and warm, some deep and cold.” The contrasting tones and shades lend themselves to this mood, with negative dark space and dark trees emerging from the solid white snow forms. The ethereal sea shapes preside over the scene.

In an attempt to relay her consciousness’ perspective, this body of work is a rich account of Tiffany Bozic’s incredible encounters with nature. Bozic describes the source of her inspiration as a “complex and inexplicable world.” However, with Qualia, Bozic’s world is within reach and beautifully discrete.

grimes-claireboucher:

Grimes by John Londono

grimes-claireboucher:

Grimes by John Londono

romantic-dystopia:

ph:Jean-Baptiste Mondino

 

fashionsfromhistory:

Evening Dress (Costume)

Travis Banton

1934 

An evocative and glamorous example of the work of Paramount Studios costume designer Travis Banton, who, during the 1930s, also dressed Marlene Dietrich, Carole Lombard, and Mae West, this dress was worn by Chinese-American actress Anna May Wong. While the dress may evoke the “cheongsam”, a from-fitting traditional Chinese dress style, its construction is along the lines of high-necked form-fitting Western gowns from the Belle-Epoque period, but the dragon motif adds a distinct Asian influence, dazzling in its execution in gold and silver sequins on luxurious satin. It was designed by Banton for Wong’s role of Tu Tuan in the 1934 film “Limehouse Blues.” Wong was a pioneer for Asian-American actors and one of the few actors in general to transition from silent to talking films. (MET)

MET